We provide and protect the salmon resource of the Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula

So there will be enough for all

Salmon return to Bear Creek Weir. Kendra Krasin

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Biologist Andy Wizik reflects on 9 years at CIAA

Biologist Andy Wizik reflects on 9 years at CIAA

This is the first time Andy Wizik got to intentially hang out with a brown bear. In 2018, CIAA sent him and a coworker to the McNeil River State Game Sanctuary to receive training on the Sanctuary’s approach to interacting with bears. This trip was under a special...

KHLT: A salmon habitat partner

KHLT: A salmon habitat partner

Baby salmon in a photarium growing up in a culvert under Oil Well Road in Ninilchik in June I am new to Alaska, a recent transplant from the high desert of Utah. The past 18 months that I’ve called this place home have taught me so much about place, community,...

7 surprising salmon product ideas

7 surprising salmon product ideas

We know that salmon is the star of the potlatch. We filet it, freeze it, can it, serve it on bagels, or bake it into pies. If we’re lucky, we might get to score a deep red bundle of dried fish called “salmon candy.” But salmon can be even more versatile than you...

Get to Know Board Member Dyer VanDevere

Get to Know Board Member Dyer VanDevere

CIAA Board Director Dyer VanDevere “Find a job you enjoy doing, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” This famous saying describes Dyer VanDevere’s life: that of a commercial fisherman.   Dyer was born in Seward, in the Territory of Alaska....

Russian Salmon Pie: Your new Alaskan holiday tradition

Russian Salmon Pie: Your new Alaskan holiday tradition

When my husband Carl and I were first married, we were living for the first time far from our families, his in Ohio and mine in California. Like many other Alaskan transplants, we needed to define and invent our own family holiday traditions. And now, two generations...

Permit holders, send us your CIAA board ballots

Permit holders, send us your CIAA board ballots

Ballots for CIAA's Inlet-Wide board election must be postmarked by January 13, 2023 or hand-delivered to CIAA headquarters by January 16, 2023. Adobe Stock If you are a commercial fishing permit holder in the Cook Inlet region, it's time to vote for candidates in the...

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Hatchery born.
Ocean raised.

The Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association is a private, non-profit corporation that engages in salmon enhancement and habitat work throughout the Cook Inlet region for the benefit of commercial, subsistence, sport, and personal use fishing.

We provide hatchery-born, ocean-raised, wild salmon harvest through science, data, and community involvement.

Hatcheries

CIAA maintains four hatcheries that enhance the wild salmon runs of the Cook Inlet region.

HABITAT

CIAA conducts numerous restoration and monitoring projects each year.

Education and Outreach

CIAA shares its knowledge and resources with the community through tours and school visits.

Salmon meals provided by Alaska hatcheries in 2018

DOLLARS ALASKA HATCHERIES INJECT INTO THE LABOR FORCE

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CIAA has been a great partner! In my over 10 years of working with them, CIAA has, and continues to be very  engaged and committed in their support of  salmon habitat conservation in the Mat-Su.

Jessica Speed

Coordinator, Mat-Su Basin Salmon Habitat Partnership

Cook Inlet map

One small association
makes a huge impact

As a private, non-profit corporation organized under the laws of the State of Alaska, CIAA engages in salmon enhancement and habitat work throughout the Cook Inlet region. This region includes waters of Alaska in Cook Inlet and Resurrection Bay north of Cape Douglas and west of Cape Fairfield including the Barren Islands and all the region’s freshwater drainages.

 

  • The Cook Inlet area is 192 miles long with more than 8,000 square miles of saltwater.
  • The area stretches 430 miles from north to south and 220 miles from east to west. It drains 39,000 square miles, about the size of Virginia.
  • The area includes the Kenai River, Kasilof River, Susitna River, Little Susitna River, Matanuska River, Resurrection River, and the outer Kenai Peninsula coast.
  • Over half of Alaska’s population live in the area—around 460,000 residents. 
  • The most popular and accessible fisheries in Alaska are located in the Cook Inlet area, Resurrection Bay, and the outer Kenai Peninsula coast.

Board affiliations

The Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association board includes members of the following municipalities and organizations

  • Cook Inlet Fishermans’ Fund
  • Cook Inlet Region, Inc.
  • Cook Inlet Seiners Association
  • Kenai Peninsula Fishermen’s Association
  • North Pacific Fisheries Association
  • Northern District Set Netters of Cook Inlet
  • United Cook Inlet Drift Association
  • Kenai Peninsula Borough
  • Matanuska-Susitna Borough
  • Municipality of Anchorage
  • City of Homer
  • City of Kachemak
  • City of Seward
  • Port Graham/Nanwalek
  • Representatives of  inlet-wide commercial fishermen and processors